Castlewood Eating Disorder Treatment Center Blog

Category Archives: Clinical Articles

How to Talk to Your Child about Eating Disorders

We often get asked the question, how do I approach my child, family member or loved one about my concerns regarding their Eating Disorder. We thought we would give some helpful tips in intervening with your loved ones, as well as some tips on how to get treatment. If you are worried about your child or family members eating behaviors or attitudes, it is important to express your concerns in a loving and supportive way. It is also necessary to discuss your worries early on, rather than waiting until they have endured many of the damaging physical and emotional effects…

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Helicopter Parenting: Coming to an office near you!

Guest Blog Post by Estelle Shumann Although helicopter parents’ “hovering” is rooted in love and meant to protect and provide for their children, the steadfast control of helicopter parents may be doing more harm to their children than good. Estelle Shumann, contributing writer to OnlineSchools.org, today investigates the connections between overprotective, over-involved parents and the development of eating disorders in teens and young adults. As both Estelle and the Castlewood Treatment Center blog suggest, a lack of independence from parents may play a role in the development of a child’s eating disorders. Harming or Helping? Helicopter Parenting’s Possible Role in…

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National Suicide Prevention Week September 9-15, 2012

This week is the 38th Annual National Suicide Prevention Week. This week is an opportunity for all of us to speak out and reduce the stigma and shame associated with asking for help! Millions struggle with Depression, Anxiety, Eating Disorders, and Addictions- all of which can lead to suicidal thoughts. By working together through awareness, promotion and education, we can reduce the incidence of suicides and prevent individuals from becoming suicidal. Castlewood proudly support Suicide Prevention Week and encourages everyone to reach out for support. Suicide Statistics: Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States with one suicide…

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Eating Disorders in “Older” Women

The International Journal of Eating Disorders recently published a new study which found that 62% of women age 50 and older surveyed said that weight negatively impacted their lives, 8% reported purging, and 70% said they were in the process of dieting or trying to lose weight.  This study illustrates what we in the field already know- Eating Disorders are not a disease of young women- they effect women and MEN of all ages. The study also illustrates that many factors contribute to the development of an eating disorder and late onset is not uncommon. Many men and women go…

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College Classes: Health/Fitness for Life

Many colleges have started requiring a health/fitness class for all students admitted to the college. This initiative I have no doubt is in the wake of a million anti-obesity campaigns and concerns about the health of our youth. In theory this sounds like a wonderful idea: Promote balanced nutrition, healthy exercise and overall health. What I have learned from my clients is that this is FAR from what happens in these courses. These courses appear to be a veritable how to guide for Eating Disorder behaviors or at the very least they can easily trigger those with an Eating Disorder.…

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New Binge Eating Research

Researchers from Boston University Medical School completed a research study which illustrated that blocking a specific receptor in the brain can reduce binge eating behavior. These findings illustrate possible treatment solutions as well as provide new insight into the neurobiological adaptations that cause binge eating behavior. Castlewood specializes in the treatment of binge eating disorder and hopes that more research will be conducted to develop better treatment options for this disorder. Click here to read more about this study and the detailed findings.

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Declaration of Independence from Dieting

Robyn Priebe, RD created this beautiful declaration of independence that we just had to share: When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for onewoman to dissolve the emotional bands which have connected her with one diet attempt after another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, a separation from dieting to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, with respect to her body, mind, and soul that she should declare the causes which impel her and other like-minded women to the separation.

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Coping Strategies for Triggered Feelings

The AWARE Strategy A = Accept the emotions.  Don’t fight them, it only makes it harder.  Accepting means saying, “Yes this reaction is here, and it is not responsible for how I think, feel, and act.” W = Watch your emotions.  Look at them without judgment.  They are neither good nor bad; they just are. A = Act despite the emotion.  Act as if you’re not __________ (whatever the feeling).  Slow down.  Don’t feed the fear. R = Repeat these steps until the emotion is more manageable or fades. E = Expect the best.  Surprise yourself with how well you…

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Working with Traumatic Memory in the Context of Trauma Therapy

Written by  Kari A. Gleiser, Ph.D. Co-Director Center for Integrative Health, Hanover, NH Working with traumatic memories in a therapeutic context is a complex, yet essential part of the healing process.  Trauma survivors who suffer from PTSD are often haunted by recurrent, intrusive memories that are crucibles of intense emotions – fear, shame, sadness, anger.  Such traumatic memories must be accessed, processed and transformed in order to heal from the traumatic experiences.  Ignoring traumatic memories in trauma therapy would be akin to a doctor not palpating a broken bone: the therapist wouldn’t be working with the emotional wound. Since memory…

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New Body Image Study

In a recent study completed by Dr. Shannon Snapp from the University of Arizona, researchers found five factors that promote a healthy body image in women. They found that young women with high family support and low levels of perceived socio-cultural pressure from family, friends and the media regarding the importance of achieving a ‘thin and beautiful’ ideal had a more positive body image. These same women also rejected the superwoman ideal, had a positive physical self-concept, and were armed with skills to deal with stress. Click here to read the full article in Medical News Today. This research highlights what…

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