Castlewood Eating Disorder Treatment Center Blog

Category Archives: Clinical Articles

Shame and Eating Disorders

One of the central tenets that can underlay the develop and maintenance of an eating disorder is a pervasive sense of shame. Shame can be described as the belief that one’s self is fundamentally flawed or damaged. According to John Bradshaw, a prolific author on shame and its effect on mental illness, “to be shame bound means that whenever you feel any feeling, need or drive, you immediately feel ashamed. The dynamic core of your human life is grounded in your feelings, needs and drives. When these are bound by shame, you are shamed to the core.” A shame based…

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Attachment: Otherwise Known as Love

Guest Post by Tamara Blum, MSW, LCSW In her book on case examples from her psychotherapy practice, Deborah Luepnitz (2002) paraphrases Arthur Schopenhauer’s fable on the dilemma of intimacy: A troop of porcupines is milling about on a cold winter’s day. In order to keep from freezing, the animals move closer together. Just as they are close enough to huddle, however, they start to poke each other with their quills. In order to stop the pain, they spread out, lose the advantage of co-mingling, and again begin to shiver. This sends them back in search of each other, and the…

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Diabulimia- What is it Exactly?

Guest Post by: Kelly E. Walker, RD, LD- Castlewood Dietitian  Diabulimia is a term that refers to a co-occurring condition of which individuals with type 1 diabetes refuse to take their insulin or significant portions of their insulin as a means to lose weight.  Omission of insulin causes the body to “purge” calories through glycosuria -the loss of glucose through the urine.  This purging of calories can be significant especially if the individual restricts most of their insulin.  The DSM-IV describes bulimia as, “Recurrent inappropriate compensatory behavior in order to prevent weight gain.”  Diabulimia has yet to be added to…

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Suicidality and Eating Disorders

Written by Nicole Siegfried, Ph.D I am delighted to join the Castlewood team in opening an affiliate center in Birmingham, Alabama. The Highlands Treatment Center for Eating Disorders is set to open this July and will provide Partial Hospitalization, Intensive Outpatient, and General Outpatient services to males and females ages 18 and older. We plan to expand services to adolescent males and females in January 2014. The Highlands will provide the same evidence-based and compassionate care associated with Castlewood facilities, and will incorporate a multi-disciplinary team that has worked together for several years in the treatment of eating disorders. I…

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Raising a Life Without Smothering It

Guest Blog Post by Brian Jones Parenting is hard work, especially when you hear about the negative effects of both under and over parenting your child. Helicopter parents are found to be a little too protective to foster creative, independence kids, while experts say that free-range parenting may just be asking for trouble by leaving your child unsupervised. Finding the middle ground, where you know that your child is safe without smothering their independence, is possible. Raising a Successful Child There are distinct disadvantages to both helicopter and free range parenting. Small children and infants benefit from having a parent…

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Victims of Bullying at Greater Risk of Eating Disorders

Guest Blog post written by Jenny Hart Research suggests that one in six American children between third and twelfth grade are bullied; 500,000 took part in a survey conducted by the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. If this isn’t worrying enough, the findings of another piece of analysis show a very strong link between those who are bullied and those who experience an eating disorder. The results A recent UK study of 600 people with an eating disorder found that 90% had been bullied at some point and 78% identified this bullying as having contributed to the development of their eating…

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Weight Loss Surgery- Concerns & Confusion

A new study published in the Annals of Surgery found that individuals who had bariatric surgery were more likely to develop colorectal cancer. Based on a study of more than 77,000 obese patients, the researched found the risk among obese patients to be DOUBLE that of a general population. While colorectal cancer risk among obese patients is typically only 26 percent higher than the general population. This suggests that by having bariatric sugery your risk does not decrease from losing weight, it may in fact increase. The researchers also went on to say that these results should not discourage people from…

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Secretive Food Concocting in Binge-Eating: Test of a Famine Hypothesis

The International Journal of Eating Disorders published this article on the relationship between binge eating and concocting: the making of strange food mixtures. This is a behavior previously anecdotally noted by eating disorder clinicians but never before systematically investigated. The authors goal was to learn more about binge eating patterns seen in Binge Eating Disorder and what drives these behaviors. Please enjoy reading this article posted below. Secretive Food Concocting in Binge Eating: Test of a Famine Hypothesis Co-Authored by: Mary M. Boggiano, PhD, Bulent Turan, PhD, Christine R. Maldonado, PhD, Kimberly D. Oswald, MA, and Ellen S. Shuman Castlewood Treatment Center supports…

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Comparision, Competition and Social Media

For many of those that suffer with eating disorders comparing and competition can be very ingrained traits. Comparing with others and yourself, is in an integral part of the disorder.  In the recovery process you begin to work towards not constantly comparing your body, your accomplishments or your problems to those around you. Finding peace with your current status, current body and current life is a journey which involves a lot of cognitive reprocessing and positive self talk. I believe to truly recovery you have to learn that happiness is not achieved by measuring up to some perceived expectation, its about defining yourself by…

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Maintaining Recovery During the Holidays

Written by Alyssa Salz, MS, RD, LD When most people think of the holiday season, they think of joy, celebrating, gathering with friends and family, and of course, enjoying holiday meals. But for individuals suffering with eating disorders or trying to maintain recovery, the holidays can bring a lot of challenges: worry over the food, what family and friends might say, and much more. This can make the season filled with stress, anxiety, and fear. Trying to imagine a holiday filled with peace and free from worry about what to eat or what not to eat is difficult to do,…

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